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All about sleep apnea types of sleep apnea obstructive sleep apnea syndrome causes of obstructive sleep apnea symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea central sleep apnea causes of central sleep apnea symptoms of central sleep apnea risk factors for sleep apnea complications of sleep apnea diagnosis of sleep apnea treatment for sleep apnea surgeries to stop sleep apnea CPAP therapy for sleep apnea {sleep disorders} dysomnias insomnia narcolepsy sleep apnea restless legs syndrome delayed sleep phase syndrome night terror sleepwalking (somnambulism) bedwetting sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) sleeping sickness sleep paralysis snoring bruxism jet lag

What types of sleep apnea are there?

There are three types of sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects primarily men between the ages of 30 and 50. It occurs when air passage in the upper respiratory tract becomes obstructed during sleep (obstruction is caused by soft tissue of the pharynx relaxing and blocking the flow of air). It prevents breathing until low levels of oxygen in the blood cause a person to respond by waking up and taking a deep, snorting breath. Being overweight or having a small tongue or mouth can contribute to the obstruction. In children enlarged tonsils or adenoids are the most common cause of obstruction

Central sleep apnea is a rare type of sleep apnea where the region of the brain and nerves that regulate breathing do not function normally and cause breathing to be impaired. It can be caused by head injury or stroke. In central sleep apnea, although the airway is open, changes in the part of the brain that controls breathing bring a temporary halt to the body's effort to breathe. Rarely, people have a combination of obstructive and central sleep apnea.

Mixed sleep apnea begins with a loss of breathing effort but ends with symptoms of obstruction. Individuals experience a combination of obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea.


More information on sleep apnea

What is sleep apnea? - Sleep apnea is a disorder in which a person stops breathing during the night. Sleep apnea means cessation of breath characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction.
What types of sleep apnea are there? - There are three types of sleep apnea, including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), central sleep apnea, mixed sleep apnea.
What is obstructive sleep apnea? - Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder in which complete or partial obstruction of the airway during sleep causes loud snoring, oxyhemoglobin desaturations and frequent arousals.
What causes obstructive sleep apnea? - Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by repetitive upper airway obstruction during sleep as a result of narrowing of the respiratory passages.
What're the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea? - Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea include loud snoring, Daytime sleepiness, memory changes, depression, and irritability.
What is central sleep apnea? - Central sleep apnea is a sleep breathing disorder that occurs when the brain fails to send the appropriate signals to the breathing muscles to initiate respirations.
What causes central sleep apnea? - Conditions that can cause sentral sleep apnea include bulbar poliomyelitis, encephalitis affecting the brainstem, neurodegenerative illnesses.
What're the symptoms of central sleep apnea? - Symptoms of central sleep apnea include extreme exhaustion and sleepiness during daylight hours, early morning headaches, lack of concentration, and memory loss.
What are the risk factors for sleep apnea? - There are several factors that may predispose a person towards sleep apnea, including gender, age, ethnicity, geography, obesity, immune abnormalities.
What are the complications of sleep apnea? - Sleep apnea is a potentially life-threatening condition because there are interruptions in breathing during sleep.
How is sleep apnea diagnosed? - A sleep test, called polysomnography is done to diagnose sleep apnea. Confirmation of the diagnosis requires making measurements while the person sleeps.
What's the treatment to stop sleep apnea? - Treatment for sleep apnea is determined based on the individual's specific circumstances and can include behavioral changes, physical therapy and surgery.
What surgeries are available to cure sleep apnea? - Surgeries to stop sleep apnea include uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, tracheostomy, radiofrequency ablation.
What about the CPAP therapy for sleep apnea? - The most effective treatment for sleep apnea is nasal continuous positive airflow pressure (CPAP) therapy.
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