health care  
 
All about multiple sclerosis causes of multiple sclerosis genetic factor for multiple sclerosis development course of multiple sclerosis risk factors for multiple sclerosis types of multiple sclerosis symptoms of multiple sclerosis diagnosis of multiple sclerosis treatment for multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis diet multiple sclerosis cures with nutritional supplements multiple sclerosis and pregnancy treatment of multiple sclerosis with vitamin D prognosis of multiple sclerosis

What 're the signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis?

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be different from person to person. Visual, sensory, and motor signs and symptoms are all part of multiple sclerosis. Some people have mild cases of multiple sclerosis with little or no disability. Others have full-blown multiple sclerosis that confines them to a bed or wheelchair. Still others are only diagnosed with

multiple sclerosis after their death and live their entire lives symptom free. This variability makes it extremely difficult to diagnose multiple sclerosis. Often the signs and symptoms are mistaken as psychiatric in origin.

Affected individuals may experience a wide variety of symptoms, such as vision loss, double vision, nystagmus, difficulty with speech, various kinds of tremor, clumsiness of the hands, unsteady gait, weakness, spasticity, numbness, and bladder, bowel, as well as sexual dysfunction. Various cognitive impairments are also common, such as difficulty performing multiple tasks at once, difficulty following detailed instructions, loss of short term memory, depression, and fatigue.

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis may occur in one of three patterns. The most common pattern is the "relapsing-remitting" pattern, in which there are clearly defined symptomatic attacks lasting 24 hours or more, followed by complete or almost complete improvement. The period between attacks may be a year or more at the beginning of the disease, but may shrink to several months later on. This pattern is especially common in younger people who develop multiple sclerosis. In the "primary progressive" pattern, the disease progresses without remission or with occasional plateaus or slight improvements. This pattern is more common in older people. In the "secondary progressive" pattern, the person with multiple sclerosis begins with relapses and remissions, followed by more steady progression of symptoms.

The first symptoms of multiple sclerosis are often visual changes. A large number of people with multiple sclerosis develop optic neuritis, which is described as painful vision loss. If you are diagnosed with optic neuritis early, treatment could change the course of the disease. Before actual loss of vision, you may have visual changes described by many people as blurred or hazy vision, flashing lights, or alterations in color. The tissues around your eye and moving your eye may be painful. Most people recover over several months. Others are left with permanent visual defects. Double vision occurs when eyes move different directions and is another common symptom of multiple sclerosis.

Later symptoms may include fatigue, muscle spasticity and stiffness, tremors, paralysis, pain, vertigo, speech or swallowing difficulty, loss of bowel and bladder control, incontinence, constipation, sexual dysfunction, cognitive changes. Weakness in one or both legs is common, and may be the first symptom noticed by a person with multiple sclerosis. Muscle spasticity, or excessive tightness, is also common and may be more disabling than weakness. Muscle weakness can involve the extremities (arms and legs) on one side of the body (called hemiparesis), both legs (called paraparesis), or all four extremities (called quadraparesis). Muscles in the affected area may tighten (called spasticity) and contract spontaneously (called spasm or clonus).

Many people with multiple sclerosis experience fatigue and need to rest and sleep during the day in order to continue their activities. The degree of fatigue may not be related to the severity of other symptoms. An increase in body temperature (e.g., caused by hot weather, hot bath and showers, or fever) can worsen symptoms or produce new ones. This occurs because elevated body temperature slows nerve impulse conduction, especially in demyelinated nerves. Double vision or eye tremor (nystagmus) may result from involvement of the nerve pathways controlling movement of the eye muscles. Visual disturbances result from involvement of the optic nerves (optic neutritis) and may include development of blind spots in one or both eyes, changes in color vision, or blindness. Optic neuritis usually involves only one eye at a time and is often associated with movement of the effected eye.

More than half of all people affected by multiple sclerosis have pain during the course of their disease, and many experience chronic pain, including pain from spasticity. Acute pain occurs in about 10% of cases. This pain may be a sharp, stabbing pain especially in the face, neck, or down the back. Facial numbness and weakness are also common. Cognitive changes, including memory disturbances, depression, and personality changes, are found in people affected by multiple sclerosis, though it is not entirely clear whether these changes are due primarily to the disease or to the psychological reaction to it. Depression may be severe enough to require treatment in up to 25% of those with multiple sclerosis. A smaller number of people experience disease-related euphoria, or abnormally elevated mood, usually after a long disease duration and in combination with other psychological changes. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis may be worsened by heat or increased body temperature, including fever, intense physical activity, or exposure to sun, hot baths, or showers.

More information on multiple sclerosis

What is multiple sclerosis? - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system characterized by the hardening of patches of tissue in the brain and spinal cord.
What causes multiple sclerosis? - Multiple sclerosis is caused by an unknown agent that gradually destroys the myelin covering, or sheath, of nerve fibers, resulting in a temporary interruption.
Is multiple sclerosis inherited? - Multiple sclerosis is a typical complex trait and susceptibility is genetically determined. People with MS inherit certain regions on individual chromosomes more often than people without MS.
What's the typical course of multiple sclerosis? - Multiple sclerosis is recognized as occurring with seven different patterns. Multiple sclerosis starts with an acute flare-up of symptoms within hours to days.
Who is at the risk of multiple sclerosis? - Multiple sclerosis affects women almost twice as frequently as men. Climate, diet, geomagnetism, toxins, sunlight, genetic factors, and infectious diseases are risk factors for multiple sclerosis.
What types of multiple sclerosis are there? - Multiple sclerosis have different patterns including relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis.
What're the signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis? - The first symptoms of multiple sclerosis are often visual changes. Later symptoms may include fatigue, muscle spasticity and stiffness, tremors, paralysis, pain.
How is multiple sclerosis diagnosed? - A definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis requires evidence for dissemination of lesions within the central nervous system both in space and in time.
What's the treatment for multiple sclerosis? - The treatment of multiple sclerosis aims at decreasing the rate and severity of relapse, reducing the number of lesions, delaying the progression of the disease.
What's prognosis of multiple sclerosis? - Most people with multiple sclerosis will be able to continue to walk and function at their work for many years after their diagnosis.
Dietary therapy for multiple sclerosis - The main role of diet in multiple sclerosis is to enable people to manage common problems which include fatigue, incontinence and constipation.
Nutritional supplements for multiple sclerosis - Nutritional therapy is used for alleviating the symptoms of multiple sclerosis or altering the natural course of the disease.
Does multiple sclerosis affect pregnancy? - Multiple sclerosis has no adverse effects on the course of pregnancy, labor, or delivery. Pregnancy doesn't affect the long term course of the disease.
Can vitamin D reduce multiple sclerosis risk? - Vitamin D supplements may positively influence the immune systems of patients with multiple sclerosis. Vitamin D has a beneficial influence on ongoing multiple sclerosis.
Neurological disorders Mainpage

Topics in neurological disorders

Autoimmune nervous system diseases
Autonomic nervous system diseases
Degenerative nervous system diseases
Central nervous system diseases
Brain diseases
Cranial nerve disorders
Headaches
Dementia
Language disorders
Perceptual disorders
Motor neuron diseases
Neurologic manifestations
Movement disorders
Peripheral nerve disorders
Sleep disorders
Spinal cord diseases
 

Featured neurological articles

Multiple sclerosis
Cerebral palsy
Migraine headache
Cluster headache
Alzheimer's disease
Stuttering
Chronic fatigue syndrome
Parkinson's disease
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Neuropathy
Peripheral neuropathy
Diabetic neuropathy
Lower back pain
Snoring
Sleep apnea
Brain tumor
Brain cancer
Spinal cord tumors

Nutrition for neurological disorders


MindSoothe for emotional health
MindSoothe, a natural herbal remedy, contains a selection of herbs known for their calming and supportive function in maintaining brain and nervous system health, emotional balance and overall wellbeing.

Neuro Natural Memory
Specifically formulated to help support brain health, Neuro-Natural Memory may help improve memory, concentration levels and reduce the potential for brain and memory function problems.

Triple Complex Sleep Tonic
Sleep Tonic helps the body relax and produce all the hormones essential for healthy sleep; safe for everyone, including pregnant and nursing women, children, and small babies.


All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005